Kosuke Okahara : Vanishing Existence

"Vanishing existence - abandoned leprosy villages in China- China, Wuzhou, Villagers work during the day. They grow corn and raise livestocks to make their living. The village is located across the river to keep them away from the others. Villagers merely go to the other side since there is still discrimination towards the disease. There were more than 100 leprosy patients in the past but now only 9 are left. Some could go back to their home while others passed away. The place is similar to poor farming villages in rural China where people are left behind in China's recent economic growth."

Japan – I traveled with Kosuke Okahara to visit ex-leprosy colonies located in the far corners of rural China. The only thing that these ex-patients had in common with each other was that they all once had the same disease.There was a time when the world considered leprosy to be a serious health issue that caused fear among society. Despite this fear ex-patients tend to live quietly in the final part of their lives.

The term Third World is today considered by some to be outdated and as a result a new term, the Fourth World, is being used to describe slum areas in third world countries that are lagging behind in economic development as well as Sub-Saharan Africa, inner city ghettos in the United States, and immigration centers for illegal immigrants in Europe.

                              Vanishing Existence © Kosuke Okahara

One of the characteristics of this new Fourth World is that people are excluded from professions, medical care, and generally any form of social life. In a social context they are not really alive, but then they are not dead either. This reminds me of the leprosy colonies that used to exist throughout the world and if the only conclusion is death for such ‘victims’ then I consider the 30,000 Japanese people who commit suicide every year as part of this new Fourth World.

Does the end of leprosy mean that the human race has achieved one of its main medical goals or does it mean the beginning of a history without any negativity? If we are waiting for the death of ex-patients, and the end of Leprosy, then it is similar to the Fourth World – a space of exclusion.

There were eleven ex-patients living in the village on the other side of the river and we were told that this was the first time they had been visited by foreigners. When our visit was coming to a close they came to say goodbye. When I looked back at the village from our small unsteady rowboat I saw old houses almost to the point of ruin. I’m sure there were people living there. Despite being excluded from society and discriminated against they were open towards strangers like us. The barrier that divided them from society was something other than the width of the river.

I was finishing the journey and witnessing the death of a disease but it felt strange to know that the villagers have not crossed the river in decades, a crossing that had only taken me a few minutes.

Text by Takeshi Nishio

Vanishing Existence – Forgotten leprosy villages in China
A limited edition book on China’s forgotten leprosy colonies has been published. This is the very first publication from the BACKYARD PROJECT Publishing from Japan.

Photography, Photos, concept & design: Kosuke Okahara
Publisher: BACKYARD PROJECT
ISBN : 978-4-907335-01-4
Date: 25 August, 2013
Printed country: Japan
# of pages; 40 pages
Size: 14,8 x 21 cm ( A5 )
Edition: 110 All signed & stamped by the author
(10 out of 110 copies are special editions)
Price: 35€ + Shipping (Sold Out)

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